Why Butter Of East coast & West coast differs?

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The East and West coastlines of the United States are very different from one another. Butter is the one item you wouldn't think would be different.

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Butter is widely utilized in the United States; in fact, each American eats 23 sticks each year, as reported by Time magazine.

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However, if you've been traveling between our two beautiful coasts, you may have noticed an unexpected butter-sized difference. 

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West of the Rocky Mountains, butter is sold in short, squat rectangles, whereas butter in the East Coast is sold in long, slender sticks.

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It all stems from the dairy sector, according to Taste of Home. Dairy farms on the East Coast and Midwest utilized an Elgin mold to shape butter.

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Butter was served in one-pound chunks until a dairy in Elgin, Illinois (thus the mold's name) began dividing it into four individual sticks.

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This method quickly expanded to the East Coast. According to NPR, the California dairy industry began to give the Midwesterners a run for their money in the 1960s.

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In order to compete with the Midwest and East Coast, dairy farmers on the West Coast created their own butter molds and began producing the iconic fat sticks.

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The only noticeable difference between the two types of butter is their form. East and West coasts remain split, and neither is likely to change.

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